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  1. The Tao of Physics - PDF Free Download
  2. The Tao of Physics
  3. The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of the Parallels between Modern Physics and Eastern Mysticism
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Jan 31, The Tao of physics by Fritjof Capra; 24 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Mysticism, Philosophy, Physics, Religion and science. Fritjof Capra’s groundbreaking exploration of the parallels between modern physics and eastern mysticism. An international bestseller which has sold over one million copies worldwide, The Tao of Physics is a classic exploration of the connections between Eastern mysticism and. TAO. OF. PHYSICS. An Exploration of the Parallels. Between Modern Physics ad Eastern Mysticism by Frifjof Capra. Shambhala. Boulder ○

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Editorial Reviews. verswritoutsudnu.gq Review. First published in , The Tao of Physics rode the wave of fascination in exotic East Asian philosophies. Decades . Apr 12, The Tao Of Physics Fritjof Capra. byjavanesegraviton. Usage CC0 Universal. Topics Sanskrit-Related-Books, संस्कृत-ग्रंथ. Collection. Title details for The Tao of Physics by Fritjof Capra - Wait list. The Tao of Physics. An Exploration of the Parallels between Modern Physics and Eastern Mysticism.

Religion - Spirituality Here is the book that brought the mystical implications of subatomic physics to popular consciousness for the very first time—way back in This special edition celebrates the thirty-fifth anniversary of this early Shambhala best seller that has gone on to become a classic. The Tao of Physics rode the wave of fascination in exotic East Asian philosophies. Decades later, it still stands up to scrutiny, explicating not only Eastern philosophies but also how modern physics forces us into conceptions that have remarkable parallels. But the big picture is enough to see the value in them of experiential knowledge, the limits of objectivity, the absence of foundational matter, the interrelation of all things and events, and the fact that process is primary, not things. Capra finds the same notions in modern physics. Those approaching Eastern thought from a background of Western science will find reliable introductions here to Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism and learn how commonalities among these systems of thought can offer a sort of philosophical underpinning for modern science. And those approaching modern physics from a background in Eastern mysticism will find precise yet comprehensible descriptions of a Western science that may reinvigorate a hope in the positive potential of scientific knowledge. Whatever your background, The Tao of Physics is a brilliant essay on the meeting of East and West, and on the invaluable possibilities that such a union promises. Ebook4Expert remains free and takes me a lot of time to search for the best books available on the net and share them with you. If you find any value and joy in my work, please consider supporting with a single donation of your choosing, in any amount, between a cup of coffee or a good lunch, via paypal or bitcoin which I prefer because it has near zero transaction fee.

Well, this is my first one star on good reads, that means this book was even worse than the Third Hunger Games book. The main reason for the one star is just my complete disappointment in this book. I went in to reading 'The Tao fo Physics' expecting to find something that correlated elements of quantum mechanics to the insights of Eastern mysticism and philosophy which I feel was a reasonable expectation. However, what I found was an author who not only was dull but founded his 'correlations' Well, this is my first one star on good reads, that means this book was even worse than the Third Hunger Games book.

However, what I found was an author who not only was dull but founded his 'correlations' on the beliefs of famous physicists and philosophers. Nothing irks me more than this in nonfiction books about physics that target the general public - why have my own beliefs or both explaining things when I can say this landmark figure said this at some point whether it be in context or not and therefore it must be true. Ironically, the one thing I really do feel Eastern mysticism and physics have in common are that both demand that if you seek more knowledge, you must always question everything and through this incessant questioning, you begin to gain understanding.

The Tao of Physics - PDF Free Download

Our author here could use a little more of that in his writing ability. I have very little positive to say about this book unfortunately. I learned a little bit more about Eastern philosophies than I knew, but I feel like there are other books out there that could have conveyed the information Capra tries to present more effectively. Capra is not good at explaining physics, Eastern mysticism, and certainly not the link between the two.

Sep 28, Riku Sayuj rated it really liked it. Not entirely sure how to take this book. Will come back to it after updating myself on the latest developments.

Aug 04, Piyush rated it did not like it. Eastern philosophy is not a singular concept - it consists of many schools of thought; some of which the author has conveniently cherry-picked and force fit to draw parallels with Quantum Physics. Truth be told, the book neither has literary merit, nor does it present any groundbreakingly profound idea.

There is a pretence of the latter, but anyone with half a knowledge of philosophy will see right through it. The only merit in the book, if one is to force himself to find one, is to see how an au Eastern philosophy is not a singular concept - it consists of many schools of thought; some of which the author has conveniently cherry-picked and force fit to draw parallels with Quantum Physics. The only merit in the book, if one is to force himself to find one, is to see how an author can paraphrase a simple idea again and again, hiding it under the guise of different metaphors and clothing it in different phrases, and make a whole book out of it.

To see this, one would have suspend the idea that the author's intent matters at all, and and then appreciate the fact that Fritjof Capra has produced a tribute to Queneau's Exercises in Style, albeit accidentally. As a matter of fact, I can reproduce the whole book here - and save you the time and expense.

Here it is: And modern physics agrees. I bought this book some 7 years ago, when I was fifteen. At the time I was getting increasingly interested in physics, and at the same time Buddhism. I decided that The Tao Of Physics is probably something similar and it's been collecting dust on my shelf ever since. Reading this book, though, I realised that this isn't really what this book is. Sure, there are legitimate criticisms to be made here. For example, some of the similarities are superficial at best.

The part that really struck me as overly silly is this part right before section III of the book.

The Tao of Physics

On the left page you see, essentially, some scribbled math equations. On the right page you see some Hindu scriptures. I mean, come on! This means absolutely nothing. Another serious criticism has come from Peter Woit, about the fact that Capra uses and continued to use the bootstrap theory: What is harder to understand is that the book has now gone through several editions, and in each of them Capra has left intact the now out-of-date physics, including new forewords and afterwords that with a straight face deny what has happened.

The foreword to the second edition of claims, "It has been very gratifying for me that none of these recent developments has invalidated anything I wrote seven years ago. In fact, most of them were anticipated in the original edition," a statement far from any relation to the reality that in the standard model was nearly universally accepted in the physics community, and the bootstrap theory was a dead idea Even now, Capra's book, with its nutty denials of what has happened in particle theory, can be found selling well at every major bookstore.

The bootstrap philosophy, despite its complete failure as a physical theory, lives on as part of an embarrassing New Age cult, with its followers refusing to acknowledge what has happened. In the first half of the book Capra simply discusses the similarities in thought between these two distinctly different ways of thinking - an intuitive and 'spiritual' way contra the empirical and rational way of science. He doesn't imply that there is something mystical about quantum mechanics, nor does he pull any New Age-trickery trying to fool you in the way that Deepak Chopra might.

For the most part in this book Capra is simply looking at the interesting similarities between these two ways of thinking - and they are striking. It's not like Capra is the first physicist to notice this.

Capra uses a lot of quotes in this book from scientists and religious figures , and here are three interesting ones: Even in our own culture they have a history, and in Buddhist and Hindu thought a more considerable and central place. What we shall find is an exemplification, and encouragement, and a refinement of old wisdom. To me, it also underscores what a spriritual endeavour science potentially can be. Jan 14, Adam rated it really liked it. This book bridged a major divide in my perception of the world, bringing together ideas of Quantum Physics and Eastern Mysticism.

Capra, trained in both disciplines, does a fine job comparing quotes and emerging universal perceptions of the early pioneers in quantum physics, against philosophers and yogis of the ancient religions of the East. In a beautiful way, you come to discover that each of these disparate disciplines are somehow describing the universe through strikingly similar metaphors.

Its not too sci-techy for the average reader, and further gives a great overview of the major Eastern religions, their early founders and principles they are based off. Dec 22, Johnny rated it did not like it Shelves: This book would have been better called "The Buddha of Physics", or something like that.

Throughout the whole book there is hardly a single reference to taoism, and certainly no understanding of taoism and its relation to other asian religions. A mild smattering of zen. Hardly any Chinese Buddhism. I found this book incredibly boring. I think I actually started skimming towards the end, whi This book would have been better called "The Buddha of Physics", or something like that.

I think I actually started skimming towards the end, which for me before I had a daughter was pretty extreme. I think I found one interesting idea in this whole book, the physics concept of bootstrapping, which took up no more than one or two sentences and a footnote.

If you are really interested in learning how taoism, or asian mysticism in general, relates to modern concepts in physics, the Dancing Wu Li Masters by Gary Zukav is much much better. View all 5 comments.

Jan 24, Erik rated it it was amazing. A book that fundamentally changed the way I felt and thought deep down inside at a time of my life when I needed some sort of metaphysical path. When you strip away the mathematics from the concepts of quantum mechanics and strong theory, etc.

The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of the Parallels between Modern Physics and Eastern Mysticism

Eastern mysticism meets modern physics. You will understand that everything is connected. Jan 03, S. When I was a kid, my grandmother used to tell me a story about a king who had gone to Brahma, the creator of the universe, to invite him to preside over the inaugural ceremony of a temple he had built.

Brahma, excused himself for a minute, and returned to give his consent exactly a minute later. The king returned happily to his kingdom on earth. But, lo and behold, years had passed. At this point of the story, my grandmother would smile at me and say, "What is a minute for Brahma, is y When I was a kid, my grandmother used to tell me a story about a king who had gone to Brahma, the creator of the universe, to invite him to preside over the inaugural ceremony of a temple he had built.

At this point of the story, my grandmother would smile at me and say, "What is a minute for Brahma, is years for earthlings. Years later, when I got acquainted with Einstein's theory of relativity and the 'personal' nature of time and space, the first question came to my mind, what came first? Einstein's theory or my grandmother's story?

Vivekananda in his famous address at Chicago said, "From the high spiritual flights of the Vedanta philosophy, of which the latest discoveries of science seem like echoes, …. And not only with Hindu religion, but also with most oriental philosophies. This book sketches out some of those parallels. The most important characteristic of the Eastern world view - one could almost say the essence of it - is the awareness of the unity and mutual interrelation of all things and events, the experience of all phenomena in the world as manifestations of a basic oneness.

All things are seen as interdependent and inseparable parts of this cosmic whole; as different manifestations of the same ultimate reality. The Eastern traditions constantly refers to this ultimate, indivisible reality which manifests itself in all things, and of which all things are parts.

Quantum theory forces us to see the universe not as a collection of physical objects, but rather as a complicated web of relations between the various parts of a unified whole. The western approach, which reflects predominantly in classical physics, is that of reductionism.

We can understand the thing, if we can understand its basic constituents. So classical physics takes a lots of assumptions and help of constants to go deeper, finer into substances. On the contrary, the eastern approach, which now the modern physics seem to adapt, tends towards holism. The whole is greater and more complex than the sum of its parts.

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And there is more ambiguity than constants. Quantum theory thus reveals an essential interconnectedness of the universe. It shows that we cannot decompose the world into independently existing smallest units. As we penetrate into matter, we find that it is made of particles, but these are not the 'basic building blocks' in the sense of Democritus and Newton. They are merely idealizations which are useful from a practical point of view, but have no fundamental significance. In the words of Neils Bohr, "isolated material particles are abstractions, their properties being definable and observable only through their interactions with other systems Conflicting and confusing theories exist simultaneously in oriental theories.

As if sides of same coin. Nothing is constant. The laws are dependent on the observer than any kind of absolutes. And if we see the quantum theory, that falls in line with similar thought process. The cat is neither dead nor alive, you see. The reality of the atomic physicist, like the reality of the Eastern mystic, transcends the narrow framework of opposite and contradictory concepts. The Upanishads say: I don't know much about Buddhism and Taoism. But, with my limited knowledge on Hinduism, I can't call it entirely scientific.

However, the parallels of some of its theories with modern science indeed make me question, "How did they know, then? Jan 12, Jen rated it really liked it. I really liked this book; but I admit it had flaws, mainly due to the actual content in relation to the title.

First, this book reads more like a review of quantum physics a subject I'm not qualified to give a critique on in terms of the book's accuracy than religion.

In many cases, the author goes on for pages about quantum physics, in technical detail, and then at the very end sticks in a throw away line about how this is similar to Buddhism or Hinduism because they both believe we are all c I really liked this book; but I admit it had flaws, mainly due to the actual content in relation to the title. In many cases, the author goes on for pages about quantum physics, in technical detail, and then at the very end sticks in a throw away line about how this is similar to Buddhism or Hinduism because they both believe we are all connected, just like on the quantum level.

I thought the way the two were tied together was in all reality, weak. However, having said this, I liked the book for two main reasons: There was probably nothing new in the book, but for me, he explained things in ways that enabled me to make better connections.

I don't have the book in front of me to give examples, but for one, I finally understood why there aren't really any fundamentally basic particles and the importance of the role of the observer to the experiment. I also gained a better understanding of the basics of protons, quarks, neutrinos, etc. This knowledge by itself enriched me from a spiritual point of view, which brings me to my next reason for liking the book: In truth, he didn't really need to spell out the similarities and connections to any religion, because on my own, I was able to reach outside the world of quantum physics to postulate a bigger meaning in all aspects of life.

I understand that most scientists, whose jobs require them to be very rigid in their theories, experiments and conclusions, probably cringe at taking science into the spiritual realm, but in the realities of everyday life, we don't live on such a rigid scale.

I can't separate my feelings, thoughts, physical reactions, spirituality etc. So to me, it seems inevitable that the more we learn about the world and what it is made of from a scientific viewpoint, the more we are going to ask, what does it all mean in the bigger picture of life?

That is what this book did for me; it made me think about the overall implications of what we are learning scientifically about the world and wonder what it means to us on a human level.

I believe from both a scientific and spiritual side that we are all connected and, without getting all new age-y, the implications of this can be profound because we are able to see that what we do to ourselves, each other and the planet are not done in isolation- there is a rippling effect across the universe. I'll stop here as I don't want to preach; I'll just say I recommend this book to people like me, who are spiritual, but also appreciate the rational science behind the 'mystique.

Those who are not spiritual in any way; who only believe in that which can be proven with rigid scientific experiments probably need to stay away from this book. Chapter 1 — Modern Physics: A Path with a Heart Any path is only a path, and there is no affront, to oneself or to others, in dropping it if that is what your heart tells you Look at every path closely and deliberately. Try it as many times as you think necessary. Then ask yourself, and yourself alone, one question Does this path have a heart?

On the one hand, it is not less sophisticated either, although its sophistication is of a very different kind. The scientists and mystics, then, have developed highly sophisticated methods of observing nature which are inaccessible to the lay person. Suzuki Chapter 4 — The New Physics Al my attempts to adapt the theoretical foundation of physics to this new type of knowledge failed completely.

It was as if the ground had been pulled from under one, to no firm foundation to be seen anywhere, upon which another one could have been built - Albert Einstein Chapter 5 — Hinduism All actions take place in time by the interweaving of the forces of nature, but the man lost in selfish delusion thinks that he himself is the actor.

But the man who knows the relation between the forces of nature and actions, sees how some forces of Nature work upon other forces of nature, and becomes not their slave - The Bhagavad Gita Chapter 6 — Buddhism Ashvaghosa probably had a strong influence on Nagarjuna, the most intellectual Mahayana philosopher, who used a highly sophisticated dialectic to show the limitations of all concepts of reality Rather, we say that inseparable quantum interconnectedness of the whole universe is the fundamental reality, and that relatively independently behaving parts are merely particular and contingent forms within this whole - David Bohm Chapter 11 — Beyond the World of Opposites It moves.

It moves not. It is far, and it is near. It is within all this, And It is outside of all this. In this space-experience the temporal sequence is converted into a simultaneous co-existence, the side by side existence of things Only when there is stillness in movement can the spiritual rhythm appear which pervades heaven and earth - Taoist text Chapter 14 — Emptiness and Form We may therefore regard matter as being constituted by the regions of space in which the field is extremely intense The discovery of symmetric patterns in the particle world has led many physicists to believe that these patterns reflect the fundamental laws of nature.

By shutting our eyes to the successive events. It is an artificial attitude that makes sections in the stream of change, and calls them things When we shall know the truth of things, we shall realize how absurd it is for us to worship isolated products of the incessant series of transformations as though they were eternal and real.

Life is no thing or state of a thing, but a continuous movement or change. But each branch of the plant, each member of the animal, each drop of its humours, is also such a garden or such a pond - Leibniz, in Monadology View 2 comments. Quando i saggi sono scritti da Saggi. Jun 29, Murray rated it did not like it Shelves: I'm afraid as hard as I tried I could not make this book work for me. The author discusses a lot about quantum physics as it was understood in the 's and eastern mysticism.

He attempts to correlate the two. The assertions were broad and conjectural, and I ended up confused about both. That may be my fault, not the author's, but so be it. I was wading through another treatise on quantum physics and relativity at the same, Paul Davie's "The Goldilocks Enigma: Why is the Universe Just Right for Life? Suffice it to say that Professor Davies has an insight that made more sense than anything Capra has to say.

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Related Topics Eastern Philosophy. Details Here is the book that brought the mystical implications of subatomic physics to popular consciousness for the very first time—way back in This special edition celebrates the thirty-fifth anniversary of this early Shambhala best seller that has gone on to become a classic.

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